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Rogue Wave Hits Louis Majesty Cruise Ship

Rogue Wave Hits Louis Majesty Cruise Ship – Louis Majesty a Cypriot-owned ship that carries 1,350 passengers and 580 crew members, was hit by a series of 33 feet (10 meters) waves

Louis Majesty

The vessel which was on a 12-day cruise from Genoa and made stops at Tangiers, Casablanca, Tenerife, Lanzarote, Cadiz, Cartagena, Barcelona was scheduled to return to Genoa tomorrow.Anna Lita who was harmed by the debris of shattered windows said: Another passenger named Giovanni Zanoni explained that it was like being on the Titanic with people screaming, panicking and grabbing life vests. That’s all we have for now on Cruise Ship Hit By Wave.

Curfew has ended in Chile’s, Concepcion, looting in the earthquake zone

Chile quake curfew ends as troops seek end to looting

More Information on the Chile Earthquake:

Earth’s days may have gotten a little bit shorter since the massive earthquake in Chile, but don’t feel bad if you haven’t noticed.

The difference would be only about one-millionth of a second.

Richard Gross, a scientist at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif., and colleagues calculated that Saturday’s quake shortened the day by 1.26 microseconds. A microsecond is one-millionth of a second.

Chile quake curfew ends as troops seek end to looting

The length of a day is the time it takes for the planet to complete one rotation — 86,400 seconds or 24 hours.

An earthquake can make Earth rotate faster by nudging some of its mass closer to the planet’s axis, just as ice skaters can speed up their spins by pulling in their arms. Conversely, a quake can slow the rotation and lengthen the day if it redistributes mass away from that axis, Gross said Tuesday.

Gross said the calculated changes in length of the day are permanent. So a bunch of big quakes could add up to make the day shorter, “but these changes are very, very small.”

So small, in fact, that scientists can’t record them directly. Gross said actual observations of the length of the day are accurate to five-millionths of a second. His estimate of the effect of the Chile quake is only a quarter of that span.

“I’ll certainly look at the observations when they come in,” Gross said, but “I doubt I’ll see anything.”

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